Maybe It’s Time To Trust LA Kings’ Tim Leiweke, AEG

LA Kings CEO and Governor Tim Leiweke, shown
here addressing the media at a press conference
on January 10, 2013, at Staples Center in Los Angeles.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: Gann Matsuda/FrozenRoyalty.net

LOS ANGELES — Since Philip Anschutz became the majority owner of the Los Angeles Kings back in October 1995, the Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG), the entertainment conglomerate-portion of Anschutz’ empire that the Kings now fall under, has been viewed by a large swath of fans with disdain, deep-seated mistrust, and even blatant hatred.

In fact, so vehement was the distrust that it might have made people wonder if the face of AEG, Kings Chief Executive Officer and Governor Tim Leiweke, wears body armor.

Some of the distrust was rooted in the Kings’ long history of mediocrity, or worse, not to mention trade and amateur draft histories that, except for a handful of notable exceptions, were so riddled with huge blunders that they could be the punch line for many jokes.

But AEG also generated a great deal of distrust on their own. Indeed, they could not hide the fact that the Kings were used to get their foot in the door in Downtown Los Angeles, securing prime real estate on the cheap so they could build Staples Center, and later, LA Live.

Read more of this post

LA Kings Broadcasters Examine The Roles Of Dean Lombardi, Darryl Sutter In Stanley Cup Win

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: Since the Los Angeles Kings won the Stanley Cup last June, the vast majority of the attention has been on the their players, for reasons that should be obvious. But someone had to show them the way, and someone else had to put all the pieces together. In part eight of a series featuring the long-time broadcasters of the Los Angeles Kings, they share their thoughts on the contributions of head coach Darryl Sutter and President/General Manager Dean Lombardi.


LA Kings head coach Darryl Sutter, shown here addressing the Staples Center crowd during the team’ Stanley Cup Championship Rally on June 14, 2012.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: David Sheehan/FrozenRoyalty.net

LOS ANGELES AND EL SEGUNDO, CA — Before the Los Angeles Kings won the Stanley Cup on June 11, 2012, they were a mostly beleaguered franchise that was known much more for stumbling and bumbling its way through its 45-year history than anything else.

For the most part, all that changed when the Kings won the Stanley Cup for the first time in their history nearly four months ago. But just six years prior, things were about as Read more of this post

Los Angeles To The Hockey World: Here’s 250,000 Reasons Why This Is A Hockey Town

Confetti flies in the air as a truck carrying Los Angeles Kings players,
along with the Stanley Cup, passes by Staples Center and LA Live
during a parade honoring the 2012 Stanley Cup Champions, on
June 14, 2012, in Downtown Los Angeles.
(click to view larger image)
Photo: Gann Matsuda/FrozenRoyalty.net

LOS ANGELES — No matter what direction you looked, if you were on or around Figueroa Street in Downtown Los Angeles on the morning of June 14, from the Financial District on the north, to Staples Center on the south, all one could see was a massive sea of people.

The Los Angeles Police Department estimated that approximately 250,000 people attended the victory parade honoring the Los Angeles Kings, who won the National Hockey League’s 2012 Stanley Cup Championship on June 11, the first Stanley Cup in the 45-year history of the franchise.

Read more of this post

Los Angeles Kings Win 2012 Stanley Cup, Turning Dreams Into Reality, The Unthinkable Into Fact

The JW Marriott at LA Live, across the street from Staples Center, got into the spirit of things, displaying this message on their gigantic video display immediately after the Kings won the 2012 Stanley Cup on June 11.
(click to view larger image)
Photo: Gann Matsuda/FrozenRoyalty.net

LOS ANGELES — After the final horn sounded on Monday night, after a 6-1 score lit up the scoreboard at Staples Center in Los Angeles, the dreams became real, the unthinkable became fact…

…the Los Angeles Kings had won the 2012 Stanley Cup, the first championship in the team’s 45-year history, closing out the Eastern Conference Champion New Jersey Devils in six games.

As Kool and the Gang’s Celebration, and Queen’s We Are The Champions played in a loop over the arena’s PA system, Kings players, coaches and management, along with their families and Kings staff, shook hands, embraced, kissed, laughed—all in rather jubilant fashion, during an on-ice celebration.

Read more of this post

LA Kings Retired Athletic Trainer Pete Demers Looks Back At Controversy Surrounding His 2006 Departure

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: After four consecutive seasons where the Los Angeles Kings were absolutely decimated by injuries, head athletic trainer Pete Demers suddenly found himself on the outside looking in, as he was “…retained in a lesser role,” following the 2005-06 season, a move that generated criticism aimed at the franchise. In part eleven of this series on Demers’ career with the Kings and in professional hockey, he talks about leaving the job he loved so much and the controversy surrounding his departure.


Los Angeles Kings retired head athletic trainer Pete Demers, shown here behind the Kings bench at Staples Center in Los Angeles on December 17, 2005.
Photo: Los Angeles Kings

LOS ANGELES — After a career with the Los Angeles Kings that spanned 37 years, starting with three seasons with their former American Hockey League affiliate in Springfield prior to joining the big club in 1972, head athletic trainer Pete Demers left the club after the 2005-06 season. But that came right after four straight seasons when the Kings were absolutely ravaged by injuries (see Retired LA Kings Trainer Pete Demers Recalls Record-Breaking, Injury-Filled Seasons, 2001-02 to 2005-06).

In two of those seasons, the Kings set unofficial records for man-games lost to injury, with 536 in 2002-03, a record they eclipsed in 2003-04 when they lost 629 man-games.

Those seasons were sandwiched between years when they lost 211 man-games to injury in 2001-02, and 366 in 2005-06 (the National Hockey League did not play in 2004-05 due to a labor dispute).

That is an unfathomable, mind-blowing 1,742 man-games lost to injury in just four seasons. Read more of this post

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 148 other followers