Professionalism And Pain: Bob Miller, Jim Fox Forced To Be Healthy Scratches During Most Of LA Kings Playoff Run

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: As so many who follow the Los Angeles Kings are very much aware, their award-winning, highly-acclaimed television broadcasters, Bob Miller and Jim Fox, were forced out of the broadcast booth after Game 5 of the 2012 Western Conference Quarterfinals with NBC having exclusive rights to televise NHL playoff games from the second round on. In the tenth installment of a series featuring the Kings’ long-time broadcasters, Miller and Fox talk about what it was like to watch most of the Kings’ magical run to the Stanley Cup from a perspective that was completely different from what they’re used to.


LA Kings television broadcasters Jim Fox (left)
and Bob Miller (right), shown here at Miller’s
Stanley Cup party on June 26, 2012.
Photo courtesy Bob Miller

LOS ANGELES AND EL SEGUNDO, CA — The complaints were loud and clear, and very, very frequent, especially once the Los Angeles Kings reached the 2012 Stanley Cup Final.

Kings fans wanted to see and hear their long-time television broadcasters, Bob Miller and Jim Fox, who were unable to broadcast games after the first round of the playoffs.

Miller, the 39-season Voice of the Kings, who was the recipient of the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award in 2000, making him a media honoree in the Hockey Hall of Fame, and Fox, who has partnered with Miller for 22 seasons, were forced out of the broadcast booth because NBC’s contract with the National Hockey League gives them exclusive broadcast rights beginning with the second round of the playoffs, a fact that many fans were not aware of, or did not understand.

Miller and Fox knew, but that did not make it any easier.

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LA Kings: Stanley Cup Is A “Rock Star” That Everybody Has To Celebrate

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: Frozen Royalty attended the Stanley Cup party hosted by Los Angeles Kings video coordinator Bill Gurney and his wife, Tina Gustin-Gurney, on September 15. In addition to comments from Bill Gurney, the story includes extensive remarks from Mike Bolt, one of the Keepers of the Cup, and a photo essay.


LA Kings video coordinator Bill Gurney (left), along
with his wife, Tina (right), with the Stanley Cup
at their Westminster, California
home on September 14, 2012.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: David Sheehan/FrozenRoyalty.net

WESTMINSTER, CA — On its final day in Southern California before heading to points east, winding its way into Toronto and Montreal before ending up at the engraver on September 22, the Stanley Cup made three stops on September 15, including a party held that evening by former Los Angeles Kings left wing and current radio color commentator Daryl Evans.

But its first stop was at the Westminster, California home of Kings Video Coordinator Bill Gurney and his wife, Tina Gustin-Gurney, who welcomed over 200 people to their home for the chance to take photographs with hockey’s version of the Holy Grail.

Family, friends, long-time Kings fans, some of Tina’s former students (she’s a teacher) and others, all got an opportunity with that majestic trophy.

“[You think about] all the people you’ve worked with over the years,” Bill said. “It’s been in the background for so long, and finally, we won it. Everybody’s got to celebrate that.”

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Stanley Cup Win Allays LA Kings’ Hall of Fame Announcer Bob Miller’s Greatest Fear

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: In the second installment of a series featuring the television and radio broadcasters of the Los Angeles Kings, the Voice of the Kings, Bob Miller, shared his thoughts on the Kings winning the Stanley Cup, its impact, and what it all means to him.


After 39 years, Los Angeles Kings television play-by-play announcer
Bob Miller got his opportunity to hoist the Stanley Cup after the Kings
won it for the first time in franchise history on June 11, 2012.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo courtesy Bob Miller

LOS ANGELES — After 39 years behind the microphone, calling the action for the Los Angeles Kings—the first 17 years on radio and television (simulcast), and for the last 21 years, exclusively on television, the Voice of the Kings, Bob Miller, has finally been able to add the one thing that was missing on his resume…

…calling the action for a Stanley Cup Championship team.

Indeed, when the Kings won the first Stanley Cup Championship in the 45-year history of the franchise on Read more of this post

2011-12 Year-In-Review: Doughty Holdout, Failure To Execute In Offensive Zone Almost Sunk LA Kings Early

2011-12 YEAR-IN-REVIEW: A turnaround of sorts in the Los Angeles Kings front office set the stage for them to win the first Stanley Cup Championship in the 45-year history of the franchise. But there was a big, black cloud floating over their heads all summer long. Second installment in a series…


LA Kings defenseman Drew Doughty, shown here speaking to the media on September 30, 2011, at the Toyota Sports Center in El Segundo, California, after signing an eight-year contract.
Photo: Gann Matsuda/FrozenRoyalty.net]

LOS ANGELES — After a very productive 2011 off-season, highlighted by the acquisition of center Mike Richards from the Philadelphia Flyers in a blockbuster deal on June 23, 2011, sending right wing Wayne Simmonds, center Brayden Schenn, and a second round pick in the 2012 National Hockey League Entry Draft the other way (the Flyers traded the pick to the Dallas Stars), the Los Angeles Kings seemed to be set up to finally become a contender, not only for the top spot in the Pacific Division, but also for first place in the Western Conference.

But there was one big problem hanging over their heads from the end of the 2010-11 season…defenseman Drew Doughty was not yet signed to a new contract, and with him looking for a huge payday, the two sides were far, far apart on reaching an agreement.

As most feared, neither side budged during the summer, and Doughty became a contract holdout. An agreement was not reached until September 30, 2011, when Doughty made his first appearance on practice ice—he missed virtually all of the Kings’ training camp.

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Los Angeles To The Hockey World: Here’s 250,000 Reasons Why This Is A Hockey Town – In Photos

Fans packed The Original Pantry Cafe, at the corner of 9th and Figueroa Streets in Downtown Los Angeles, prior to the
start of the victory parade honoring the 2012 Stanley Cup
Champion Los Angeles Kings.
(click to view larger image)
Photo: Gann Matsuda/FrozenRoyalty.net

LOS ANGELES — On June 14, Los Angeles, more specifically, Los Angeles area hockey fans, proved the critics wrong.

Indeed, those who claim that Los Angeles is not a hockey town were blown off the ice 250,000 times over, maybe more than that, by the fans who packed the parade route and the rally inside Staples Center, celebrating the Los Angeles Kings winning the 2012 Stanley Cup, the first Stanley Cup Championship in franchise history.

In a story published this morning, Kings fans, young and old, recent fans to those who have been there from Day One back in 1967, shared their feelings and experiences about what it meant to see their team win it all…finally.

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