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LA Kings Trade For Defenseman Brayden McNabb Likely More Important Than Gaborik Deal


Defenseman Brayden McNabb was acquired by
the Los Angeles Kings from the Buffalo Sabres
on March 5, 2014.
(click above to view larger image)

EL SEGUNDO, CA — While everyone was ooh-ing and ahh-ing over the Los Angeles Kings acquiring sniper Marian Gaborik from the Columbus Blue Jackets in a trade deadline deal on March 5 (see LA Kings Trade For Marian Gaborik Is A Good One, But… for details and analysis), they may have overlooked another deadline day trade by the Kings that could have a longer and deeper impact on the franchise.

In that deal, the Kings acquired defenseman Brayden McNabb, right wing Jonathan Parker, and second round picks in the 2014 and 2015 NHL Drafts from the Buffalo Sabres in exchange for forward/defenseman Nicolas Deslauriers and right wing Hudson Fasching.

Lombardi noted the difficulty he had in giving up highly-touted prospects in this deal.

“Very hard,” said Lombardi. “That’s one of those deals where neither GM really likes it.”

“We gave up two very good prospects with size, but it was one of those things where you say, you know what? You’ve got to give to get,” added Lombardi. “This was interesting too, because there is a new GM there. He was very decisive and sometimes you’re not sure, but he’s had a tremendous amount of background in personnel. He recognized the same thing. He won’t like giving up McNabb, but we both had a surplus and it made sense for both of us.”

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Retired Athletic Trainer Pete Demers Goes From Stick Boy To 34 Years With Los Angeles Kings

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: Many will recognize and remember retired Los Angeles Kings athletic trainer Pete Demers, who spent 37 years in the organization. But few know what his job entailed, beyond assisting injured players, or just about anything else, for that matter. In this story, the first of a multi-part series, Frozen Royalty looks at how Demers got his start in professional hockey.


Retired athletic trainer Pete Demers started in the Kings organization
in 1972 with the Springfield Kings of the AHL, before his 34-year stint with
the Los Angeles Kings.
Photo: Demers Family Collection

LOS ANGELES — He never scored a goal in the National Hockey League, but was always at the players bench. He never made a pad save, blocked a shot, or threw a body check on NHL ice, but he was a bigger part of the Los Angeles Kings than most would probably give him credit for.

To be sure, after 34 years and 2,632 consecutive games with the Los Angeles Kings, retired trainer Peter Demers, arguably, the Dean of professional hockey trainers, past and present, left a huge, indelible mark on the franchise.

Of course, those who remember Demers, who retired following the 2005-06 season, have probably seen him behind the bench at a game, or when he has had to run out onto the ice to care for an injured player. But few know much more than that, not only about Demers himself, but also about all the duties and responsibilities of an athletic trainer for a professional hockey team, work that relatively few people ever get to see. Read more of this post

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