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LA Kings Lifted The City Over Their Heads – Broadcaster Daryl Evans Talks Stanley Cup, Its Impact

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: The Los Angeles Kings have four of the best broadcasters in the business, and, in this series, Frozen Royalty got their reactions to the Kings winning the Stanley Cup, the prized trophy’s travels around the world, fan reaction to it, how the Kings won it all last season, and much, much more. First installment in a series.


Los Angeles Kings radio color commentator and former Kings left wing
Daryl Evans, shown here skating (yes, without laces) at
the Toyota Sports Center in El Segundo, California.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: David Sheehan/FrozenRoyalty.net

EL SEGUNDO, CA — Almost three months have passed since the Los Angeles Kings won the first Stanley Cup Championship in the 45-year history of the franchise, but the celebration continues unabated, with the trophy traveling all over the world with Kings players, coaches, team and front office staff.

Celebrating right along with everyone else in the organization are the Kings broadcasters, each having a long history of their own with the franchise.

The Voice of the Kings, television play-by-play announcer Bob Miller, leads the way, having just completed his 39th year behind the microphone with the Kings. Read more of this post

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Frozen Royalty Audio: LA Kings Turn 4-0 Lead Into Flop On Figueroa In Game 3 vs. San Jose

LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles Kings have a couple of tremendous comeback victories in their playoff history, despite so many years of post-season failure.

On April 10, 1982, at the Forum in Inglewood, California [their first permanent home arena], the Kings found themselves looking up at a 5-0 deficit after two periods against the Wayne Gretzky-led Edmonton Oilers in Game 3 of their first round playoff series. But the Kings came roaring back to score five straight goals in the third period and then win it in overtime, 6-5.

19 years later, the Kings were down 3-0 after two periods to the vaunted Detroit Red Wings in Game 4 of their first round playoff series. All looked lost, but the Kings came back to win the game in overtime, 4-3 on April 18, 2001 at Staples Center in Los Angeles.

That 1982 game, known as the “Miracle on Manchester,” is the greatest comeback in the history of the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Not quite as miraculous, the 2001 comeback was nearly as amazing, and became known as the “Frenzy on Figueroa.”

A third huge comeback can now be added to the Kings’ history. But this time, they were the ones who coughed up a big lead. Read more of this post

Los Angeles Kings Will Need A Miracle To Win First Round Series Against San Jose

Los Angeles Kings right wing Justin Williams (right) will return to the lineup for Game 1 of his team’s first round playoff series against the San Jose Sharks on April 14, 2011 at HP Pavilion in San Jose, California.
Photo: David Sheehan

EL SEGUNDO, CA — With less than 16 hours left, at the time of this writing, before the Los Angeles Kings open their first round playoff series against the San Jose Sharks at HP Pavilion in San Jose (7:00 PM PDT, televised in Southern California on Fox Sports West, nationally on Versus, and in Canada on TSN and RDS), one thing is clear…

…without star center Anze Kopitar, it will take a miracle for the Kings to win this series and advance to the second round. Read more of this post

LA Kings Trainer Emeritus Pete Demers On The Evolution of Treatment, Strength And Conditioning

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: In part three of a multi-part series of stories featuring the career experiences of the Los Angeles Kings’ long-time, now retired, athletic trainer Peter Demers, Frozen Royalty takes a close look at a few of Demers’ memories from his early years with the Kings, along with the evolution of how injuries are treated and how much the emphasis on strength and conditioning has changed over the years.


Los Angeles Kings retired head athletic trainer Pete Demers (1970's photo).
Photo: Los Angeles Kings

LOS ANGELES — Back in the 1970’s when Pete Demers began his 34-year career as the head athletic trainer for the Los Angeles Kings, a career that would see him work in 2,632 consecutive games, as previously reported (see LA Kings Retired Trainer Pete Demers Had To Be A Jack Of All Trades), Demers and assistant athletic trainer John Holmes did the work of the athletic trainers, the equipment managers, the strength and conditioning coaches and the massage therapists that National Hockey League teams have today.

Demers, who retired in 2006, has vivid memories of years past, and even remembers his first road trip with the Kings.

“We went to Pittsburgh on a five or six-game trip,” he reminisced. “That was just a small trip. We’d go on the road for 16 days. We had two or three of those a year.” Read more of this post

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