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LA Kings Retired Trainer Pete Demers Dealt With Much More Than Injuries To Players

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: In part five of an exclusive series based on an extensive interview with Los Angeles Kings head athletic trainer emeritus Pete Demers, Frozen Royalty takes a look at the most visible aspect of his job, caring for injured players…and trainers are definitely not immune from injury or illness, either…


LOS ANGELES — For athletic trainers in the National Hockey League, their most important job is to treat injured players and help them recover from their injuries, and in a 34-year career with the Los Angeles Kings, retired head athletic trainer Pete Demers has probably treated more injuries and illnesses than any of his colleagues, past or present, and not just those suffered by players.

To be sure, caring for injured players is the one aspect of the athletic trainer’s duties that is the most visible, and for Demers, it was no different. Like other trainers, he was most noticeable whenever he jumped over the boards and scurried out onto the ice to care for an injured player.

Even before he made it to the NHL, Demers already had experience dealing with serious injuries. Read more of this post

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Frozen Royalty Audio and NHL Video: LA Kings Win Game Against Carolina, But Lose Doughty

LOS ANGELES — Ryan Smyth, Michal Handzus, Anze Kopitar and Andrei Loktionov scored a goal each to lead the Los Angeles Kings to a sloppy 4-3 win over the Carolina Hurricanes in front of 17,769 fans at Staples Center on October 20.

Smyth opened the scoring at 5:43 of the first period finishing off a play that saw Smyth and line mates Jarret Stoll and Justin Williams all driving hard to the front of the net. Read more of this post

LA Kings Winger Justin Williams Has A Lot To Prove In 2010-11

LOS ANGELES — Three games into the 2010-11 National Hockey League regular season and going back to the start of their 2010 training camp, perhaps the biggest concern for the Los Angeles Kings has been who is going to score goals besides the usual suspects, including Anze Kopitar, Ryan Smyth and Dustin Brown.

Perhaps the biggest question mark in that regard has been right wing Justin Williams, who was a solid contributor offensively last season, until he suffered a broken right leg at Phoenix on December 26, 2009.

Williams, who turned thirty years old on October 4, missed 28 games because of the injury, and was nowhere near the same player he was prior to suffering the injury upon his return.

At no time was that more clear than when he was scratched from the lineup after the Kings lost Game 1 of their Western Conference Quarter Final series at Vancouver on April 15, 2010.

Williams sat out three games of that series, returning in Game 5, a 6-4 Canucks win, giving Vancouver a 3-2 series lead.

Add to that his injury-filled 2008-09 season when he played in just 44 games for the Carolina Hurricanes and the Kings, Williams’ last two NHL seasons were memorable for the wrong reasons.

“I’ve had a couple of tough years that I just want to forget about and put behind me,” he said. Read more of this post

Jay Wells: A Stalwart On The Blue Line For The LA Kings

EL SEGUNDO, CA — As they reminisce about their team, hockey fans generally remember the skilled, offensively gifted players, the star netminders, or the heavyweight enforcers.

They also remember players who are memorable for the wrong reasons. But rarely do they remember the guys in the trenches, the unsung heroes who do a lot of the dirty work, making things possible for the skilled players, but go mostly unnoticed.

The same applies to the Los Angeles Kings, as their fans easily remember stars like Wayne Gretzky, Luc Robitaille, Marcel Dionne, Rogie Vachon and Rob Blake.

They also remember the players who were memorable for their sheer ineptitude, like Troy Crowder and Barry Potomski, among others. Read more of this post

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