About these ads

LA Kings Trainer Emeritus Pete Demers On The Evolution of Treatment, Strength And Conditioning

FROZEN ROYALTY EXCLUSIVE: In part three of a multi-part series of stories featuring the career experiences of the Los Angeles Kings’ long-time, now retired, athletic trainer Peter Demers, Frozen Royalty takes a close look at a few of Demers’ memories from his early years with the Kings, along with the evolution of how injuries are treated and how much the emphasis on strength and conditioning has changed over the years.


Los Angeles Kings retired head athletic trainer Pete Demers (1970's photo).
Photo: Los Angeles Kings

LOS ANGELES — Back in the 1970’s when Pete Demers began his 34-year career as the head athletic trainer for the Los Angeles Kings, a career that would see him work in 2,632 consecutive games, as previously reported (see LA Kings Retired Trainer Pete Demers Had To Be A Jack Of All Trades), Demers and assistant athletic trainer John Holmes did the work of the athletic trainers, the equipment managers, the strength and conditioning coaches and the massage therapists that National Hockey League teams have today.

Demers, who retired in 2006, has vivid memories of years past, and even remembers his first road trip with the Kings.

“We went to Pittsburgh on a five or six-game trip,” he reminisced. “That was just a small trip. We’d go on the road for 16 days. We had two or three of those a year.”

Read more of this post

About these ads

Jeremy Roenick: One Black Mark On An Otherwise Stellar Career

COMMENTARY: Forward Jeremy Roenick announced his retirement from the National Hockey League on August 6, 2009, ending a stellar NHL career that spanned twenty years and will earn him induction into the hallowed halls of the Hockey Hall of Fame as soon as he is eligible. But there is one nagging little thing that, especially to the chagrin of Los Angeles hockey fans, no one is talking about…


LOS ANGELES — At a press conference on August 6, San Jose Sharks forward Jeremy Roenick announced his retirement from the National Hockey League, ending a glorious NHL career that saw him don the jerseys of the Chicago Blackhawks, Phoenix Coyotes, Philadelphia Flyers, Los Angeles Kings and the Sharks.

In that twenty-year span, Roenick scored 513 goals and contributed 703 assists for 1,216 points with 1,463 penalty minutes in 1,363 regular-season games. The only American-born players who have scored more goals are Mike Modano and Keith Tkachuk.

In the playoffs, Roenick scored 53 goals and tallied 69 assists for 122 points with 115 penalty minutes in 154 games, although the Stanley Cup would elude him.

In international play, Roenick represented the United States at the 1998 and 2002 Olympic Games (won the silver medal in 2002). He also played in the 1992 Canada Cup, World Championships (1991, runner-up) and World Junior Championships (1988 and 1989).

Roenick, easily one of the greatest US-born players to ever play the game and who will undoubtedly be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, should be proud of what he accomplished in his twenty years in the NHL. Read more of this post

Future Hall Of Famer Jeremy Roenick To Retire

Editor’s Note: The following was originally published on the Online Kingdom on April 1, 2006, as the annual April Fools Day gag story. It is being re-published here on Frozen Royalty with future Hockey Hall of Famer and former Kings forward Jeremy Roenick announcing his retirement from the National Hockey League this week.


LOS ANGELES — On Saturday, prior to their game against the Dallas Stars at Staples Center (7:30 PM Pacific time), the Los Angeles Kings announced that veteran center Jeremy Roenick has been waived.

Taking his place on the roster will be right wing prospect Konstantin Pushkarev, who was assigned back to the Manchester Monarchs of the American Hockey League (Kings’ primary minor league affiliate), on Friday. This will be a “paper” transaction—Pushkarev never left Los Angeles after traveling with the Kings from Edmonton.

Roenick, the future Hall-of-Famer, has had a less-than-disappointing 2005-06 season, scoring an anemic eight goals and ten assists for eighteen points with a -8 plus/minus rating in fifty games this season, a far cry from what was expected of the Kings’ number one center, who never came close to playing like one. Read more of this post

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 135 other followers